The Most Incredible Optical Illusions (And How They Work)

Optical illusions exploit the discrepancy between what your eyes perceive and what your brain interprets, revealing how your visual system processes images.

Before the understanding of their mechanisms, people crafted optical illusions. Now, neuroscience explains many, while some remain mysterious.

The "checker shadow illusion" demonstrates how shadows affect our perception of color. Square A and B appear different due to the brain's compensation for shadows.

Troxler's fading illustrates how our visual system ignores static stimuli and focuses on moving ones, exemplified by the shifting green dot amid stationary lilac dots.

Motion induced blindness, where dots disappear around a blinking light, lacks a definitive explanation, though it likely involves the primary visual cortex.

The Hering illusion, with radiating lines appearing to bow outwards, may relate to the brain's tendency to predict the near future based on visual cues.

The simultaneous contrast illusion, akin to the checker shadow illusion, tricks the brain into perceiving shading differences on a monochrome bar.

Illusory motion, like that seen in the intro slide, remains unclear, with theories ranging from fixation jitter to neuronal confusion.

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